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 Post subject: Hard Times [CRD]
PostPosted: Mon Jan 01, 1990 1:01 am
  

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The W!zard

Joined: Aug 25, 1999
Posts: 1044
Images: 117
Location: Leonardtown, MD
Hard Times
words and music by Woody Guthrie

adg wrote:
Hard Times

Verse
G/ D/ G///
G/ A/ D///
G/// C/ G/
G/ D/ G///

chorus
C/// G////
Em/// A/ D///
G/// C/ G/
G/ D/ G///

adg's notation = a chord (like G) equals one beat on that chord. So if you see G you strum the guitar once with a G chord. and a slash (like /) is another strum in the same chord as the notation that proceeds it. So, G/ would be two strums on a G chord.

"Hard Times" is in 4/4 which means there are four strums (one per beat) in a measure. A measure is the most convenient way of knowing when a rhythm starts repeating itself. So there are 4 beats then it begins again with another four etc.

As others have noted, chords also can be written as numbers. In the key of G, G is written as I. In the key of C, C is number one and so on. So the verses would be written for any key as follows:

I/ V/ I///
I/ II/ V///
I/// IV/ I/
I/ V/ I///

OR

1/ 5/ 1///
1/ 2/ 5///
1/// 4/ 1/
1/ 5/ 1///

Now no one actually strums a strum per beat in songs like this except those first learning the basics - learning where the chords are. It's actually picked in an alternating style where for each beat (or strum) you'd play a bass note (in this case starting with G - that's a finger on the low E string on the third fret) then strum the rest of the chord. So now you got two things to do per beat! Then you'd move on to fingering the D chord and play it first picking the open low D string, followed by the D chord… on and on.

Hope that explains more than you needed

PS you get these numbers by playing a scale. There are usually 8 notes in a scale the 8th a repetition of the first but higher or lower (an octave away). so the 4th note in a G Major scale is C - G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G (again) See?. So in the chorus written in numbers (not shown), Em (E minor chord), would be written VIm because it's the sixth note in the G scale and played as a minor chord.

Whew.... Too much info? Hahaha Good Luck


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 Post subject: Hard Times [CRD]
PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 3:06 pm
  

BlunderVirgin

Joined: Sep 29, 2009
Posts: 1
My father-in-law is turning 80 this year and for his birthday has requested that his grandkids play some bluegrass music for him. I think he would like "Hard Times," but I need help finding the chords.
Thanks,
Paula


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2009 5:22 pm
  

BlunderVirgin

Joined: Dec 14, 2009
Posts: 2
Such a good song but seems like chords are not available? A far better guitarist than me can probably figure out the structure just listening. Is there an Arlo Guthrie book with Hard Times? Dad's song? I 'll call "them" in Mass.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 26, 2009 10:33 pm
  

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Joined: Aug 25, 1999
Posts: 1270
Location: Herndon, Virginia
It's easy to figure out. It basically uses the I IV V chords. Pick a key. Play three chords in that key. See, wasn't that easy?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 2:47 am
  

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Joined: Jan 09, 2003
Posts: 2488
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Location: Rhododendron, Oregon United States
Half step by half step...


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 10:02 pm
  

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Joined: Sep 13, 2000
Posts: 8512
Location: Pixley-- Actually An Hr South of Richmond, VA
Just wondering what the the I IV V chords are? I know it sounds dumb but I play by ear anymore instead of by music these days. SO much easier and I don't have to buy music...


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 27, 2009 10:20 pm
  

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Joined: Jan 09, 2003
Posts: 2488
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Location: Rhododendron, Oregon United States
Those are roman numerals for the type of progression. 1,4,5 is a very common progression. If you're in G it is G,C, D. It comes from the notes in the scale. In G, G is the first note in the scale, C the fourth, and D the fifth. If you're in A, it is A, D, E. If you're in E, it is E, A, B. So, if it's hard to sing the song in the key that it is written, you can transcribe it to another key.

Not sure that makes sense...

Edited for grammar. Doubt I got it all, though...


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 8:04 am
  

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Senior ArloNetizen

Joined: Oct 03, 2008
Posts: 339
Location: Belgium
Is this not the Blues progression ?


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 9:22 am
  

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Joined: Jul 06, 2008
Posts: 2531
Images: 2
Location: Crawfordville, Florida
'Tis indeed Guitarman. How have you been? Did you get some snow in Belgium? The 1, 4, 5 progression is also the basic pattern for 'country' and bluegrass, as well as lots of jazz tunes 8)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:38 pm
  

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Joined: Sep 15, 1999
Posts: 6408
Goofus wrote:
Edited for grammar. Doubt I got it all, though...


ain't it hell


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 4:55 pm
  

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Joined: Jan 09, 2003
Posts: 2488
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Location: Rhododendron, Oregon United States
agnes wrote:
Goofus wrote:
Edited for grammar. Doubt I got it all, though...


ain't it hell


it is


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:04 am
  

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Senior ArloNetizen

Joined: Oct 03, 2008
Posts: 339
Location: Belgium
Thank you Kevin , yes whe had a white Christmas this year . The last time whe had this was back in 1981 ! There's gonna be some more snow on newyearsday they said . No problem for me ( i must not go to work before the 8th of januari ) So let it come :)
For my guitarplaying i still cant reconize the chords by ' ear ' so i must help myself with the internet or with my books . The lessons in guitarschool are stopped until the end of januari . Hope you have a great year end . Greetings , Luc. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2009 12:59 am
  

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Joined: Sep 13, 2000
Posts: 8512
Location: Pixley-- Actually An Hr South of Richmond, VA
Thanks for the info. That will come in handy when I play in the bluegrass jam on Friday..


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:25 pm
  

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The Folkslinger

Joined: Nov 23, 1999
Posts: 633
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Location: Housatonic, MA
Hard Times

Verse
G/ D/ G///
G/ A/ D///
G/// C/ G/
G/ D/ G///

chorus
C/// G////
Em/// A/ D///
G/// C/ G/
G/ D/ G///

adg's notation = a chord (like G) equals one beat on that chord. So if you see G you strum the guitar once with a G chord. and a slash (like /) is another strum in the same chord as the notation that proceeds it. So, G/ would be two strums on a G chord.

"Hard Times" is in 4/4 which means there are four strums (one per beat) in a measure. A measure is the most convenient way of knowing when a rhythm starts repeating itself. So there are 4 beats then it begins again with another four etc.

As others have noted, chords also can be written as numbers. In the key of G, G is written as I. In the key of C, C is number one and so on. So the verses would be written for any key as follows:

I/ V/ I///
I/ II/ V///
I/// IV/ I/
I/ V/ I///

OR

1/ 5/ 1///
1/ 2/ 5///
1/// 4/ 1/
1/ 5/ 1///

Now no one actually strums a strum per beat in songs like this except those first learning the basics - learning where the chords are. It's actually picked in an alternating style where for each beat (or strum) you'd play a bass note (in this case starting with G - that's a finger on the low E string on the third fret) then strum the rest of the chord. So now you got two things to do per beat! Then you'd move on to fingering the D chord and play it first picking the open low D string, followed by the D chord… on and on.

Hope that explains more than you needed

PS you get these numbers by playing a scale. There are usually 8 notes in a scale the 8th a repetition of the first but higher or lower (an octave away). so the 4th note in a G Major scale is C - G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G (again) See?. So in the chorus written in numbers (not shown), Em (E minor chord), would be written VIm because it's the sixth note in the G scale and played as a minor chord.

Whew.... Too much info? Hahaha Good Luck


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 31, 2009 2:55 pm
  

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Arlo Fanatic

Joined: Feb 26, 2009
Posts: 1200
Nice! Free theory for the New Year!


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