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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 10:32 am
  

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I will say this: it doesn't take a rocket-scientist to foresee a situation in the not-too-distant-future when enough clean water to go around will be a major problem.


Well... at least THIS rocket scientist is doing all within his means to solve that problem before we get there. If nobody notices then they are at fault not me. :wink:


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 10:54 am
  

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DrCharbonneau wrote:
Quote:
I will say this: it doesn't take a rocket-scientist to foresee a situation in the not-too-distant-future when enough clean water to go around will be a major problem.


Well... at least THIS rocket scientist is doing all within his means to solve that problem before we get there. If nobody notices then they are at fault not me. :wink:


You and people like you are a major source of my optimism and hope! :D


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:24 pm
  

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Thinking about Madison he sounds like he was an alright dude. But if what I remember is, he was, basically for States' Rights as a Governor of Virginia, and then wanted Federal power when President. (Please correct me if I am mistaken on that.) Those are, so to speak, major contradictions, which have US in this mess.

I'll keep looking towards things like Vermont's Single Payer, and North Dakota's State Bank. 17 States have Bills going through their State Houses for State Banks. Vermont even has a Bill to issue its own currency. After surviving 30 years of bs out of DC, that big Govt does not, nor ever will work for the people.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 3:42 pm
  

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nortonkevin wrote:
DrCharbonneau wrote:
Quote:
I will say this: it doesn't take a rocket-scientist to foresee a situation in the not-too-distant-future when enough clean water to go around will be a major problem.


Well... at least THIS rocket scientist is doing all within his means to solve that problem before we get there. If nobody notices then they are at fault not me. :wink:


You and people like you are a major source of my optimism and hope! :D


:?: For what reason?

I think we need to find ways to implement free enterprise without oppression... in any form. As an example, any homeowner can have their own biomass fuel-water processor. A solar still in their back yards or in the center of their homes. Big industry on especially a local level will want to deny it and likely be favored at decide time. There should never be any judge bought to decide on our right to intrinsically "do good business" as we like. Capitalism isn't bad, it's the ones who own the greatest shares in it, so often, that leach the calcium from its backbone of small business.

That is one of the greatest attractions to being a freelance musician, or even visual artist, than to being owned. There are a good number of folk clubs around the planet.

TJ and Co. meant for the people to be the government and the elected officials servants. It was good then. Unfortunately it's all a monster now and will not obey.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 4:50 pm
  

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heraclitis wrote:
That's right...The Old Sauer Kraut and Solar Energy:

Before Biomass Conversion turned into turning Corn into Alcohol (whose f'in dumb idea was that)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE7QzCfjVEg


just real quick

another great tune! that is beautiful.

oh remember that switchgrass stuff? i think they are still looking at that?


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:22 pm
  

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I've been experimenting with a process that turns biomass plus some catalysts and Ph balancers into propanol then condenses it to isopropyl alcohol. You can burn it for heat or to make steam. Imagine a cellumetaloid plastic extruded into what is an organic version of fiberglass. And as soon as I wrote that I thought of Cheech and Chong's "Up In Smoke."


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 22, 2012 5:31 pm
  

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i also really liked this

heraclitis wrote:

Well I suppose we can all just give up and live out our time here on this dying planet!

or

We can muster all our powers of thought and persuasion and attempt to get everybody to sing a few bars of "we are one people on one planet" and walk out!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 8:23 am
  

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DrCharbonneau wrote:
I've been experimenting with a process that turns biomass plus some catalysts and Ph balancers into propanol then condenses it to isopropyl alcohol. You can burn it for heat or to make steam. Imagine a cellumetaloid plastic extruded into what is an organic version of fiberglass. And as soon as I wrote that I thought of Cheech and Chong's "Up In Smoke."


I'll bite:

What is the source of the biomass? What is the feed rate and how well characterized is the incoming material?When you say catalysts are you referring to the cellulometaloid? What are the metals and how are they poised? Propanol is an odd end point for an anaerobic conversion, propionate is however the rate limiting fatty acid in most conversions, so what is going on here? Is this proprietary? What about methane? Is the process dependent on methanogenesis or do you actively divert the electrons? Does that involve the catalyst? Is the catalyst susceptible to poisoning? What size vessel is involved? Do you use a multiple stage process?

Inquiring minds want to know?


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 8:30 am
  

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leoburg wrote:
Thinking about Madison he sounds like he was an alright dude. But if what I remember is, he was, basically for States' Rights as a Governor of Virginia, and then wanted Federal power when President. (Please correct me if I am mistaken on that.) Those are, so to speak, major contradictions, which have US in this mess.

I'll keep looking towards things like Vermont's Single Payer, and North Dakota's State Bank. 17 States have Bills going through their State Houses for State Banks. Vermont even has a Bill to issue its own currency. After surviving 30 years of bs out of DC, that big Govt does not, nor ever will work for the people.


I would think being President and being Governor would give a self interested individual differing perspectives. So the question becomes, is it good to be for States Rights (often somehow co-opted to stand for individual rights) or is it good to be a Federalist? Given upcoming events, not so much a question of history as reality! The Affordable Health Law will be argued before the BENCH soon!


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 10:34 am
  

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After what I've heard, from that year of babble-on, with 2000 pages of baloney, my mind's eyes are on Vermont's Single Payer, and North Dakota's State Bank, which ''could'' even fund the States.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 1:58 pm
  

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leoburg wrote:
After what I've heard, from that year of babble-on, with 2000 pages of baloney, my mind's eyes are on Vermont's Single Payer, and North Dakota's State Bank, which ''could'' even fund the States.


So, are you opposed to the Affordable Health Care Law (and its current don't mess with big Insurance stance) or do you think it unconstitutional? Given the rhetoric and misinformation that you call the year of babble on...it is unlikely that any revisions will be entertained for some time to come.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 24, 2012 3:28 pm
  

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It puzzles me how they could not have combined Kucinich's call for a Public Option on State levels (I think that is I recall him saying.) with the GOP's Health Coops.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:49 am
  

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heraclitis wrote:
DrCharbonneau wrote:
I've been experimenting with a process that turns biomass plus some catalysts and Ph balancers into propanol then condenses it to isopropyl alcohol. You can burn it for heat or to make steam. Imagine a cellumetaloid plastic extruded into what is an organic version of fiberglass. And as soon as I wrote that I thought of Cheech and Chong's "Up In Smoke."


I'll bite:

What is the source of the biomass? What is the feed rate and how well characterized is the incoming material?When you say catalysts are you referring to the cellulometaloid? What are the metals and how are they poised? Propanol is an odd end point for an anaerobic conversion, propionate is however the rate limiting fatty acid in most conversions, so what is going on here? Is this proprietary? What about methane? Is the process dependent on methanogenesis or do you actively divert the electrons? Does that involve the catalyst? Is the catalyst susceptible to poisoning? What size vessel is involved? Do you use a multiple stage process?

Inquiring minds want to know?



Hmmmm....

As of the moment, yes, it would be a bit proprietary, but that doesn't mean that once I have the "new and improved" processor built and working, I won't release it as public domain. I diecovered it by accident, as many things are. It's a different type of still, but uses a fractionating condenser. Charcoal, coal or even graphite can be a slurry that works as a substrate.

The point is that it can make an alchohol that the government doesn't regulate... yet, I imagine. It is another use of biomass.

Metalocelluloid or cellumetaloid, is another material I've been working on for years off and on. I'm not the only one working on this.

Methane is okay, but propane is easier compressed and of course isopropanol (rubbing alcohol) is a storable liquid. You end up heating your home with a glorified alcohol lamp, or a refurbished kero burner.

The isopropanol isn't as fumey though.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:54 am
  

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BTW folks... there's no hook to "bite" on with me ever. If there's a consignment board in a comm I may use it, but that's what it's there for. Just ideas and things an independent scientist may work on and then offer in the near future. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 25, 2012 11:05 am
  

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DrCharbonneau wrote:
heraclitis wrote:
DrCharbonneau wrote:
I've been experimenting with a process that turns biomass plus some catalysts and Ph balancers into propanol then condenses it to isopropyl alcohol. You can burn it for heat or to make steam. Imagine a cellumetaloid plastic extruded into what is an organic version of fiberglass. And as soon as I wrote that I thought of Cheech and Chong's "Up In Smoke."


I'll bite:

What is the source of the biomass? What is the feed rate and how well characterized is the incoming material?When you say catalysts are you referring to the cellulometaloid? What are the metals and how are they poised? Propanol is an odd end point for an anaerobic conversion, propionate is however the rate limiting fatty acid in most conversions, so what is going on here? Is this proprietary? What about methane? Is the process dependent on methanogenesis or do you actively divert the electrons? Does that involve the catalyst? Is the catalyst susceptible to poisoning? What size vessel is involved? Do you use a multiple stage process?

Inquiring minds want to know?



Hmmmm....

As of the moment, yes, it would be a bit proprietary, but that doesn't mean that once I have the "new and improved" processor built and working, I won't release it as public domain. I diecovered it by accident, as many things are. It's a different type of still, but uses a fractionating condenser. Charcoal, coal or even graphite can be a slurry that works as a substrate.

The point is that it can make an alchohol that the government doesn't regulate... yet, I imagine. It is another use of biomass.

Metalocelluloid or cellumetaloid, is another material I've been working on for years off and on. I'm not the only one working on this.

Methane is okay, but propane is easier compressed and of course isopropanol (rubbing alcohol) is a storable liquid. You end up heating your home with a glorified alcohol lamp, or a refurbished kero burner.

The isopropanol isn't as fumey though.


Methane is odorless? Propanol is not a common fermentation end product? At best you can achieve a small fraction of percent and it will invariably include larger proportions of ethanol which will co-elute in an separation technology the most common being distillation that requires energy input?


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